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Dating gainesville fl

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The scoring system uses points to calculate sentences based on the severity of the crime, the defendant’s prior record and a host of other factors.Arakaki had priors for consuming alcohol in public.

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Confidential informants noted the sales took place near a church in their reports, and prosecutors mentioned the proximity in their initial charging documents.“This is a culture war,” said Lisa Graybill, deputy legal director for the Southern Poverty Law Center.“We are long past the point of thinking the war on drugs does anything to affect usage, public health or safety, so it’s a fair question to ask: Why are we still doing all of this?When the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office arrested Brackins on a warrant months later, they enhanced the $100 drug deal to a more serious first-degree felony. A few blocks north, Tampa police arrested Alan Arakaki for selling oxycodone pain killers to a confidential informant at Arakaki’s apartment complex near the University of South Florida.Deputies reported the deal took place near a small, Hispanic church — and Florida law says Brackins threatened their safety to worship. They busted the 37-year-old white man for the same crime a month later.• Laws on the books since the crack epidemic continue to bloat racial disparities.

Heightened penalties for carrying drugs near churches, parks and public housing blanket minority communities , where police roam for low-level offenders.

Blacks also see their sentences swell because they often have more prior arrests and longer records than comparable whites, leaving them with less leverage to negotiate down a drug-free zone enhancement.

“Everyone would agree we want the system to work well and be fair, and it can always be better,” said R. Larizza, state attorney for the 7th Circuit Court and president of the Florida Prosecuting Attorneys Association.

His battle with addiction cost him his 7-year-old daughter in 2011, when the courts granted temporary custody to his parents in Boise, Idaho.

Arakaki worked off and on as a computer tech at the UPS store on Fowler Avenue that a friend managed, but he struggled to hold down a steady job and faced eviction, court records show.

He was picked up six times for driving without a license.