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Dating in the 1600 s

Much cruder imitations of bronze vessels also occur in the ubiquitous gray pottery of the Shang dynasty.A chopine is a type of women's platform shoe that was popular in the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries.

dating in the 1600 s-57dating in the 1600 s-90dating in the 1600 s-31

During the Renaissance, chopines became an article of women's fashion and were made increasingly taller; some extant examples are over 20 inches (50 cm) high.The delicate potting of the Longshan ware and the prevalence of offering stands and goblets suggest that these vessels were made not for burial but for sacrificial rites connected with the worship of ancestral spirits.Ritual vessels, oracle bones (used by shamans in divination), ceremonial jade objects and ornaments, and architecture (pounded-earth foundations, protective city walls, rectilinear organization) reflect an advanced material culture on the threshold of the Bronze Age.This culture continued in outlying areas long after the coming of bronze technology to the central Henan–Shaanxi–southern Shanxi region.glazes.A small quantity of stoneware is covered with a thin, hard, yellowish green glaze applied in liquid form to the vessel.In his dancing manual Nobilità di dame (1600), the Italian dancing master Fabritio Caroso writes that with care a woman practiced in wearing her chopines could move “with grace, seemliness, and beauty” and even "dance flourishes and galliard variations".

Chopines were usually put on with the help of two servants.

Often, the fabric of the chopine matched the dress or the shoe, but not always.

However, despite being highly decorated, chopines were often hidden under the wearer's skirt and were hidden from any critical observation.

Although due to the design of the shoes, they caused the wearer to have a very “comical walk.” According to some scholars, chopines caused an unstable and inelegant gait.

Noblewomen wearing them were generally accompanied by two servants in order to walk around safely, by supporting themselves on the servants' shoulders.

The earliest evidence for art in any form in ancient China consists of crude cord-marked pottery and artifacts decorated with geometric designs found in Mesolithic sites in northern China and in the Guangdong-Guangxi regions.