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Your social worker cannot just refer to the fact that you have had a previous child taken into care, and they need to get an independent judge to agree that there is a sound reason for removing this baby.Section 1 of The Children Act 1989 creates a statutory obligation to put the needs of the child first.

Children come into care for many reasons including parental abuse and neglect.It is a very serious decision to take a child into care and this decision is carefully scrutinised by an independent children’s guardian and by the court.Furthermore, children are only adopted when it can be shown that it is in their best interest, and again, this decision is scrutinised by an independent guardian, as well as an adoption panel with a majority of members independent of the local authority, and by the court.For further discussion, please see our post on Forced Adoption.In fact, there is a lot of evidence that this is not happening, including: Social services do not take children into care to unnecessarily be adopted.If birth parents believe they have had their child taken into care unfairly, they should lodge a formal complaint with their local authority. I certainly do not believe children are systematically being taken into care to meet adoption targets.

Although the amounts of money paid to local authorities who meet their targets for placing children in their care and for assessing adoptive parents can be large – scroll down to the bottom of this page to see figures from September 2007 – they do not exceed the cost of the care proceedings.

Dividing £2,156,586 by 205 would give an average payment of £10,519.93 per child placed for adoption.

Even without details for the costs of all social workers involved in a case, plus legal representatives at court – usually for both the local authority and the family involved – plus court time, plus foster carers, it is clear that any money paid in the form of a bonus does not come close to covering the cost of removing a child from their family and placing them for adoption.

This doesn’t mean that your social work doesn’t care about the impact this would have on you, but that they are obliged to put the child first and foremost. There are a number of reasons why plans might change, including if you can demonstrate that you are willing and able to make the necessary changes to address the concerns that led to adoption being considered as an option for your child.

In England between 20, 9% of permanence plans (on average) moved away from adoption to another option, such as returning to a parent, residency with another family member or long term foster care.

It’s the culmination of 13 years of education and should be celebrated to the fullest extent.