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Dating antique screws

dating antique screws-3

Some popular antiques are quite well documented and may be tied to a specific time period in history making an age determination quite simple. Adding to the complexity is the proliferation of copycat builders and modern furniture craftsmen who do an admirable job of cloning authentic antique furniture right down to the tool marks and date stamps.

These are an often overlooked method of determining the age of an antique the builder is telling you when it was constructed!Tool marks and obvious signs of rough cuts are fairly typical with pieces more than 150 years old.That said, it is important to realize that skilled craftsmen are building furniture by hand even today so you'll want to continue to investigate the age of the piece using at least one other method.You’ll want to take a look at the address listed on the production tag.Many fakes list a full address for the builder, including 5-digit zip codes.If rough surfaces, plane scrapes, and tool marks are evident inside the piece of furniture, or on the back or bottom surfaces, you're probably looking at a pre-1860 model.

This is one of the easiest ways to provide a fairly accurate date stamp to any antique.

Combining this dating process with several other techniques will help you make an accurate age determination.

Dovetails have long been a popular method for attaching two pieces of wood at a 90-degree angle often seen in drawer construction.

But, it is important to determine which type of wood is most prevalent in your antique to help determine the age.

Oak is highly popular in furniture that dates from 1700 to earlier years.

Keep in mind, wood components can be replaced and this may affect your ability to determine the exact age of a piece.